This past weekend we spent some time working on the loft floor. It may seem as a crazy step and completely out of order given we don’t have electric work done, siding, plumbing hooked up, walls, etc but we decided this was a step we wanted to take. The main reason we wanted to take this step was so our son could start exploring and enjoying his new space and getting some more time with us. When the weather was nice and we were working on the tiny he was playing outside right along our side. Now that the rain has hit and we’ve seen cooler days he’s been in our “normal sized” house while we go in frequently checking on him. With the floor in he can play in the loft or plug in his travel DVD player and veg out watching a movie (gasp… I know).

Now on to the floor…I’ve been researching all design elements of our tiny house (aka coming up with unnecessary, fun projects for my husband to figure out :) ). We’re going with a rustic industrial style and I came across a fun project to try for the loft floors. I figured that if we loved it, it could be used for the floors throughout the house and if not I was confident we would like it well enough for the loft.

Enter project…make new wood look old! I found a couple sites used for inspirations (see links at bottom of article) and from there we began our project. We rounded up some random tools to beat up the wood (we choose a wood that we felt already had character with lots of knots in it). We first tested on some small scrap pieces to make sure we didn’t hate any of the methods we used. In fact there was one method we didn’t like so we didn’t do it. Then later tested the stain and realized we liked it once stained and went back and added it to some pieces.

Random tools to beat up the wood!

Random tools to beat up the wood!

Scrap tested piece.

Scrap tested piece.

The hubs and I randomly grabbed tools and started distressing the wood! We did both sides since the underside of the loft floor would be the ceiling to the room below. We did the method completely randomly. I don’t think my husband was particularly looking forward to this project but he did seem to enjoy this “destructive” project once he was in it! In other words he was fiercely hammering while I was delicately making punctures!

After testing the stain (we had purchased 2 different colors) we decided we truly favored one so we decided to stick with it. We did want it to have different hues though so on each board it varied how long we let the stain set. We also learned from one of our references that if you put on a layer of water first the stain won’t take as much/get as dark so we used that method as well. We stained both sides and were excited to see what it looked like the next morning since we were ultimately working in the dark :). We were quite happy with the results the next morning! At this point we see using this same method for the rest of the flooring in our house! Most importantly our son is excited his “loft is done.”

Loft floor!

Loft floor!

Underside/Ceiling I love that the color makes the raw cedar beams pop!

Underside/Ceiling
I love that the color makes the raw cedar beams pop!

Close up to see some "distressing"

Close up to see some “distressing”

 

Resources:
Making Old Wood Look New

DIY Wood Flooring